Facebook Scrapbook Examples
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Tag Your Kiddos in New Facebook Scrapbooks

If you are anything like me, you may post a few photos of your kids on Facebook. OK… more than a few. One thing that has always bugged me is that there is no way to tag my littlest kiddos in photos because they are too young to have their own Facebook profiles (the age limit is 13, people!). I thought it’d be sups awesome if there was a way to create almost like a placeholder profile for our underage kids so that when they hit 13 and join the site we wouldn’t have to go back through our photos and tag hundreds and hundreds (and, SERIOUSLY, hundreds!) of pics dating all the way back to birth.

WHOA – It’s like Facebook read my mind. The platform just launched Scrapbooks as a way for parents to tag photos of their kids who do not yet have a Facebook profile. YAY!!!

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Can’t Buy Me Love! Wait, Yes You Can. But DON’T.

Have you ever been following someone on Twitter or Instagram (who is NOT a celebrity) and noticed a huge spike in their number of followers from one day to the next?  I have.  It’s weird. Does such an increase make me, the follower, think that what you have to say suddenly got more interesting or credible?  Nope.  Do I suddenly find you to be more important?  Nope.  Especially when a quick check of who the influx of followers are provides all the evidence I need to see that most (if not all) of this newly found flock are fake accounts rather than real people.

Here’s a look at the follower numbers for an account that buys followers periodically.  You can clearly see the days that purchases were made and days that Twitter does massive fake account deletions.

Followers for Twitter account that purchases followers

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When Actual Self ≠ Digital Self: Vetting People Online

In our Audience Insight class during my Master’s program, we learned about the theory of self-discrepancy and how the differences between our actual selves (how we really are), our ideal selves (how we want to be perceived) and our ought selves (how we think others want us to be) apply to consumer behavior.  For instance, we often make purchases based on our ideal or ought selves rather than our actual selves.  This theory got me thinking about how we present ourselves online.  Check out this infographic based on an Intel study.  It’s clear that many people lie on social profiles for the purpose of improving how they appear to others.

Is the Social Media You the Real You?

TechDigest

As you post on social sites and/or on your blog, do you present yourself as you actually are?  Or do you present yourself as the person you’d like to be? Or the person you think people want you to be?  Or do you fall somewhere in between?
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